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Inclusion & Diversity

Different together.

At Apple, we’re not all the same. And that’s our greatest strength. We draw on the differences in who we are, what we’ve experienced, and how we think. Because to create products that serve everyone, we believe in including everyone.

Retail Market Leader

Apple has a very accepting culture. Everyone here really values individuality.

Read Emi’s story

Retail Market Leader

Emi’s career at Apple has spanned four regions and two countries. She started in Long Island, then advanced to opportunities in Manhattan; Washington, DC; and now Tokyo. “I discovered there was an opening in Japan through a conversation with my manager. It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Today, I’m a market leader here, working with stores east of Tokyo and getting ready to open two more this year.”

From the very beginning of her career at Apple, Emi felt supported by her colleagues — especially management. In fact, her manager in New York was one of the first people she told that she was gay. His encouragement gave Emi the confidence to come out to her family.

I realized early on how open and accepting Apple was. There isn’t just one specific example or story — it’s how everyone truly wants you to be yourself.

Now, as she and her wife are settling in to life in Tokyo, Emi is using her role as a leader to make sure that her teams have the same feeling of acceptance and belonging that she has at Apple.

We’re making consistent progress.

For the past five years, we’ve continued to hire more women and underrepresented minorities every year. This is driving our progress over time. As we bring in new team members and support their growth at Apple, we’re highly encouraged that our workforce will become more representative at all levels of the company.

Women at Apple

Overall representation of women continues to increase at Apple globally. Our greatest progress is seen within the under-30 and new-hire populations.

2020 30 % Overall representation

2020 31 % Overall representation

2020 32 % Overall representation

2020 32 % Overall representation

2020 33 % Overall representation

2020 31 % Under 30 years old

2020 33 % Under 30 years old

2020 35 % Under 30 years old

2020 36 % Under 30 years old

2020 38 % Under 30 years old

  • Under 30 years old
  • Overall representation

Women new hires

2020 30 % Overall representation

2020 31 % Overall representation

2020 32 % Overall representation

2020 32 % Overall representation

2020 33 % Overall representation

2020 31 % New hires

2020 35 % New hires

2020 37 % New hires

2020 35 % New hires

2020 36 % New hires

  • New hires
  • Overall representation

We’re championing equal pay around the globe.

We’ve achieved pay equity in every country where we operate — women earn the same as men when performing similar work. In the United States, underrepresented minorities earn one dollar for every dollar white employees earn. Every year, we examine the compensation employees receive and make adjustments to ensure that we maintain pay equity.

As part of our commitment to achieving pay equity globally, we’ve also stopped asking candidates about their salary history.

And in 2020, we received a top ranking for pay equity by Arjuna Capital’s Gender Pay Scorecard in the technology industry.

Senior Business Systems Analyst

Apple gives veterans the opportunity to make the most of their skills and abilities. There’s a support network here to help you be successful.

Read Kirk’s story

Senior Business Systems Analyst

Kirk spent more than two decades in the U.S. Army, and military culture was deeply ingrained in him: the structure, the purpose, the teamwork. When he retired as a lieutenant colonel, he was concerned about transitioning to civilian life. “I didn’t know if I’d fit into the culture of any company unless it was military related. But I wanted something different.”

Kirk’s fears faded the moment he walked into an Apple veterans hiring event. He met veterans who worked at Apple in everything from engineering to finance, and who had found a community that valued their military experience and dedication to collaboration. By the end of the event, he knew he wanted to work at Apple.

Apple gives veterans an avenue to be who they want to be and do what they want to do. There’s just a wealth of opportunities here.

Now Kirk is using his decades of military experience to help make Apple’s logistics and systems support more efficient — and to help fellow veterans transition to civilian life. As a cochair of the Apple Veterans Association, he helps newly hired veterans find long-term success at Apple through career development and mentorship programs.

Senior Director of Worldwide Developer Marketing

We’re constantly looking at ways to bring women into tech and asking ourselves how we can do more.

Read Esther’s story

Senior Director of Worldwide Developer Marketing

Esther has been at Apple long enough to remember her daughter, who recently received her driver’s permit, crawling around her first office. But Esther’s dedication to bringing women into tech started long before that.

quote by Esther

There were very few women studying computer science with me when I attended university. It was stark. So bringing more women into technology has always been a passion of mine.

Now in addition to her role as senior director of Worldwide Developer Marketing, Esther is the executive sponsor of [email protected] She also helps connect Apple with an ever-growing list of STEM organizations focused on bringing more women and underrepresented groups into technology.

In 2020 Esther drove the launch of the first Apple Entrepreneur Camp for organizations founded and led by women. The two-week technology lab provides one-on-one, code-level guidance from Apple engineers and the opportunity to get feedback from Apple’s senior women leaders. “We hope this program inspires women around the world to join the iOS developer community and share in the thriving app economy. Research shows that these women are likely to use what they learn — and earn — to help their local communities. And that effect is even bigger in underserved populations.”

Underrepresented minorities in the U.S.

Overall representation of underrepresented minorities continues to increase at Apple in the United States. Our greatest progress is seen within the under-30 and new-hire populations.

2020 19 % Overall representation

2020 20 % Overall representation

2020 22 % Overall representation

2020 23 % Overall representation

2020 24 % Overall representation

2020 25 % Under 30 years old

2020 28 % Under 30 years old

2020 29 % Under 30 years old

2020 31 % Under 30 years old

2020 35 % Under 30 years old

  • Under 30 years old
  • Overall representation

Underrepresented minorities new hires

2020 19 % Overall representation

2020 20 % Overall representation

2020 22 % Overall representation

2020 23 % Overall representation

2020 24 % Overall representation

2020 21 % New hires

2020 24 % New hires

2020 27 % New hires

2020 27 % New hires

2020 31 % New hires

  • New hires
  • Overall representation

The next generation of leaders is more diverse.

Apple is a multigenerational company with employees from 18 to 87. We support the development of all our employees throughout their Apple journey, and we’re proud that so many of our people choose to remain at Apple for a long time.

Employees under 30 represent a third of our total workforce. They are our most diverse and fastest-growing population. Today, 45 percent of leaders under 30 are women, and 17 percent are underrepresented minorities. And we’re deeply committed to ensuring that each generation of leaders is more representative than the last.

Director of Siri Data Science and Engineering

There are insights we can only get from working with people who bring different perspectives.

Read Yael’s story

Director of Siri Data Science and Engineering

Yael has always been interested in using data and systems to help people. At the beginning of her career, she worked on how medicines affect people differently based on their DNA. Now she is a leader on the machine learning and AI team for Siri.

Siri has to think in different languages and understand cultural nuances, so we need people who can bring voices of different cultures to our team. Diversity is especially important when building machine learning products. If the data isn’t representative of a global population, our products won’t be built for all people.

Yael creates an open environment that encourages teamwork across cultures, and she makes sure there are tools available for everyone to feel productive, safe, and open. “Having diversity creates more diversity. Not only about what we work on, but how we work together.”

She also started the Apple-wide [email protected] Diversity Network Association. “It’s a forum where women can get training, mentorship, access to leaders, and really practical advice. As it has grown, many men have joined so they can better understand the challenges for women and be an active part of the solution.”

Representation at Apple in the U.S.

Our new hires are even more diverse than our current employees.

  • New hires are employees hired since July 1, 2020. Data as of December 2020.

A more diverse future begins with more opportunities.

From our earliest days, Apple has always believed that education is the great equalizer. We’re dedicated to empowering students and educators at all levels. We partner with community colleges, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), minority-serving institutions, and others through programs like AppleCare College and our Apple HBCU Scholars internship program. And we’re developing partnerships to reach even more diverse talent across all ages and career stages. Here is a list representing some of the organizations we’re proud to partner with:

  • AnitaB.org – Grace Hopper Celebration
  • FIRST
  • Girls Who Code
  • National Center for Women & Information Technology
  • Rewriting the Code
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Thurgood Marshall College Fund

Senior Manager of Hardware Engineering

As a manager and leader of the Apple Muslim Association, I want to make sure people feel comfortable and free to practice whatever they practice.

Read Adil’s story

Senior Manager of Hardware Engineering

Adil is a global team leader and a cochair of the Apple Muslim Association (AMA). His work takes him all over the world, from the United States to Israel to China. And although the customs and cultures are different, the goal to make Apple employees feel at home is universal.

We’re not a company for just one type of people or one kind of country. We’re making products for the world.

When the travel ban restricted immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries to the United States, Adil worked with senior leadership and the AMA to help employees who were affected — providing informational resources, emotional support, and even legal representation. “I think how we responded to the travel ban was really a testament to how Apple supports its employees. We were able to help people who went through a very difficult situation.”

In addition to the work he does with the AMA in the United States, Adil encourages his employees all over the world to speak up about their needs. Those conversations have led to companywide improvements in how we support global cultures, like respecting Israel’s Sunday-through-Thursday workweek and adding more halal options to cafeterias.

Accessibility and Speech Test Engineer

This is my dream job. I get to work on projects I am passionate about that help people.

Read Ibrahim’s story

Accessibility and Speech Test Engineer

Ibrahim is driven by the desire to empower people of all abilities. When muscular dystrophy caused him to lose mobility, Apple’s Switch Control made it possible to use his iPhone with the joystick on his wheelchair. And in college, he gave talks that raised awareness among educators about the importance of accommodating people with disabilities.

At Apple, Ibrahim uses his passion and problem-solving skills to make technology more accessible for everyone across a broad range of physical abilities. This has led to many new assistive technologies and accommodations.

quote by Ibrahim

We hired a QA engineer with low vision who showed us how he lives on his devices from day to day. He had to invert colors manually every time he wanted to see a picture. So we created a new feature called Smart Invert that does it automatically.

In addition to Ibrahim’s work as a test engineer, he is frequently consulted by other teams to improve accommodations for employees with disabilities. He’s collaborated on projects for Switch Control, AssistiveTouch, and Siri capabilities. “I am determined to make things more accessible because I know it’s going to help other people, not just me.”

Application Security and Risk Coordinator

It’s rewarding to share my background with my coworkers, learn about theirs, and create a team culture that’s very open and transparent. It makes work feel like home.

Read Tyelisa’s story

Application Security and Risk Coordinator

In college, Tyelisa’s math scores were so high that the dean convinced her to switch her major to computer science. When she earned a fellowship from the Executive Women’s Forum in graduate school, its members mentored her. One of them eventually worked at Apple and encouraged Tyelisa to interview.

Now Tyelisa is part of a team that ensures that our products meet Apple’s strict security standards. Yet despite her impressive qualifications, she credits much of her self-confidence — and success — to key moments with family and mentors throughout her life. And now she’s paying it forward from the other side.

quote by Tyelisa

Part of the reason I work here is to make sure that people with backgrounds similar to mine see Apple as a place to work. To help show people all the opportunities here.

Tyelisa is an active member of the Apple Christian Fellowship and [email protected], mentoring younger employees and working to strengthen Apple’s presence at recruiting events. She was instrumental in Apple’s sponsorship of the Black Enterprise Women of Power Summit. And outside of work, Tyelisa gives talks at schools to inspire kids with her story. “The youth is the future. We have to make sure they’re equipped with the knowledge they’ll need to build new technologies.”

An inclusive culture for all.

At Apple, inclusion and diversity means bringing everybody in. We welcome all voices and all beliefs.

We’re proud to hire and support U.S. veterans. Through their experiences, they bring leadership, technical skills, and a spirit of collaboration to Apple. And we advocate on behalf of LGBTQ+ people because we believe that LGBTQ+ rights are human rights.

For more than 30 years, Apple employees have found community and connection in Apple’s Diversity Network Associations, employee-led groups that foster a culture of belonging through education, leadership programs, and networking. Today over 25,000 Apple employees belong to groups like [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected], and a range of faith-based groups.

Vice President of EMEIA Operations

Apple really encourages people to feel cultural pride, a sense of belonging, and that they’re welcome. It’s one of the things I love about working at Apple.

Read Cathy’s story

Vice President of EMEIA Operations

Cathy is the youngest of eight, a mother of three, and the vice president of EMEIA (Europe, Middle East, India, and Africa) Operations at Apple’s Cork facility in Ireland. What started as a 60-person operation is now a 6000-person-strong community representing 104 countries. With such a diverse workforce, it was important for Cathy and her team to create an inclusive community built on the recognition of individual cultures.

Here in Cork we have programs for people to celebrate their nationalities and feel welcome, and also to feel they belong and fit into the overall environment.

Cathy and her teams launched several initiatives, including Diversity Week — five days of parades and events celebrating international cultures. The response was so overwhelming that it turned into an annual program of events.

The community of expats in Cork has also had a positive impact on the city itself. “Foreign nationals come here, not sure of what to do at the weekends. And then all of a sudden they go volunteering. Amazing relationships are built from volunteering events, and they’re making such a difference overall.”

Retail Store Leader

This job makes me want to be a better leader, a better person, and to help people do the best work of their lives.

Read Consuela’s story

Retail Store Leader

Consuela’s role as a store leader of San Francisco’s Union Square Apple Store is half strategist, half cultural ambassador. “My job is to make sure that we’re creating a welcoming space for customers, and to make sure my team is excited and prepared to engage with all the different customers that come in.”

With a staff of more than 350, Consuela dedicates a lot of her time to one-on-one conversations about everything from career development to personal goals. She motivates by listening, and she encourages her team to see that customers aren’t only looking to buy a computer or find lost photos. They’re looking for a better way to work, or to revisit a meaningful moment in time.

quote by Consuela

Being a leader at Apple means you’re held accountable for creating an environment where people feel included and welcomed, and to see value in who they are. It’s not just a recommendation. It’s expected of you.

Consuela leads by being authentic, even if that means being vulnerable. “I’m a black, white, and Puerto Rican woman. I’m part of the LGBTQ+ community. I’m a mother of a transgender son. I think sometimes just sharing some of those intimate parts of who I am — and how I’ve come to be who I am — gives people hope.”

We’re committed to doing more.

We know that an inclusive and diverse workforce drives innovation and makes Apple stronger. That’s why we’re committed to hiring more diverse talent for jobs at all levels, attracting candidates from more diverse pipelines, leveraging technology to prevent bias, and driving development efforts to increase representation in leadership across the company.

A look at the last five years.

  • 2020
  • 2020
  • 2020
  • 2020
  • 2020
  • Overall
  • Tech
  • Nontech
  • Leadership
  • Retail
  • Retail leadership

Global gender

  • Overall
  • Tech
  • Nontech
  • Leadership
  • Retail
  • Retail leadership

U.S. race and ethnicity

Data as of December 2020. To align with U.S. government reporting requirements, data on this website uses the traditional gender categories of male and female. Apple deeply respects that gender is not binary; reporting in this manner should not represent our position on the issue. Underrepresented minorities: groups whose representation in tech has been historically low — Black, Hispanic, Native American, and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data supplied by the People team at Apple. Totals may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

The population of employees whose race or ethnicity was undeclared decreased from 6 percent in 2020 to less than 1 percent in 2020 and continues to remain below 1 percent in 2020. This decrease came as a result of stronger internal processes and employees properly identifying themselves. Because the majority of our previously undeclared employees identified as White, the decrease had no impact on the representation rates for any other group. Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of July 2020.

The population of employees whose race or ethnicity is undeclared this year is less than 1 percent. This decrease comes as the result of stronger internal processes and employees properly identifying themselves. Because the majority of our previously undeclared employees identified as White, the decrease had no impact on the representation rates for any other group. Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of June 2020.

Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of June 2020.

Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Gender data as of August 2020. Race and ethnicity data as of June 2020.

Our most recently filed Federal Employer Information Report EEO-1, representing employees as of December 2020, is available for download below. We make the document publicly available, but it’s not how we measure our progress. The EEO-1 has not kept pace with changes in industry. We believe the information we report elsewhere on this site is a more accurate reflection of our progress toward diversity.

4 Common Diversity And Inclusion Myths In The Workplace

This article is the second in a series focused on Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) in the workplace. D&I and I&D are used interchangeably as both have become common references for diversity and inclusion.

My previous article “The Dangers Of Mistaking Workplace Diversity For Inclusion In The Workplace” highlighted the myth of “diversity” and “inclusion” being synonymous concepts and the dangers of not distinguishing the two. The truth is that this is just one diversity and inclusion myth of many. As organizations scramble to more fully and substantively embrace D&I, it’s critical to fully understand and counteract these pervasive myths that so often inhibit true progress.

Myth #1 – Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) is About Ethics and Morality

Reality – True but D&I is very much about the bottom line as well.

The truth is that while building a more diverse and inclusive work environment is generally considered a nice thing to do, the financial and business justification for such initiatives is quite compelling (and oftentimes the primary impetus). McKinsey & Company’s January 2020 report “Delivering through Diversity” concludes, “Many successful companies regard I&D as a source of competitive advantage. It makes sense that a diverse and inclusive employee base – with a range of approaches and perspectives – would be more competitive in a globalized economy.” Nicole Mitchell, Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Cedars-Sinai Health System reinforces this sentiment. “To those unfamiliar with the benefits of a strong D&I strategy, it’s seen as only a feel-good function for business. But when human and financial resources are put behind this work and it’s integrated into an organization’s goals, you can see the true impact: higher retention, higher levels of employee engagement, broader attraction of top talent, better community image, stronger financial performance and more innovation.”

Furthermore, some argue that there’s an explicit cost to not embracing D&I. Former CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, Dr. Derreck Kayongo refers to the “Discrimination Cost Index (DCI)” as the price organizations pay when they stay on the sideline and fail to focus on D&I. Kayongo insists that failure to embrace D&I can lead to costly and burdensome lawsuits, brand erosion, loss of goodwill in the marketplace and accelerated employee turnover among other direct and indirect costs. Similarly, McKinsey’s 2020 report concludes, “There is a penalty for opting out. Overall, companies in the bottom quartile for both gender and ethnic/cultural diversity were 29% less likely to achieve above-average profitability than were all other companies in our data set.”

Myth #2 – The concept of diversity excludes white men.

Reality – Diversity encompasses all human differences and excludes no one.

Obviously, corporate America’s history is one where white men have been considered “the majority” and women and people of color have faced discrimination in the workplace and beyond. Vernā Myers, Vice President of Inclusion for Netflix addresses this reality within the context of workplace diversity and inclusion efforts.

As humans, we are all diverse. However, there are certain types of differences that have been marginalized and excluded because of historic systems and structures that were intentionally designed to favor one group over another — white, male, straight, etc. The systemic inclusion and exclusion of certain groups over a long period of time allowed access to opportunities and industries for only some groups and those groups gained dominance and power in those industries and became the norm. So I&D initiatives should focus on these groups, but also acknowledge the multi-dimensionality of all groups and individuals.

Vernā Myers, Vice President of Inclusion, Netflix

That said, the diversity umbrella includes everyone and needs everyone’s support to be most successful. Diversity and Inclusion expert and producer of the podcast Every Day Conversations on Race, Simma Lieberman insists “Everyone is diverse in different ways, although not everyone has to deal with exclusion and discrimination. We can’t have full diversity, equity and inclusion without the participation of white men or any other group.”

It’s also important to remember that diversity and inclusion efforts should be tailored to the needs of each specific organization. While D&I efforts are typically focused on engaging underrepresented minorities within an organization, those groups can vary depending on the setting. I worked with an American university that had certain graduate level science departments that were overwhelmingly populated with international students and had very little U.S. student participation. Their D&I efforts focused in large part on attracting more American students to create more diversity for that specific department. Indeed, D&I efforts are not automatically focused on one particular group but instead the intent is to cultivate a diverse environment that is also inclusive. Ultimately, inclusion requires everyone’s participation and excludes no one.

Myth #3 – Diversity is just about gender and race.

Reality – Diversity encompasses many visible and invisible human traits.

While race and gender are more obvious elements of diversity, diversity focuses on a variety of traits. Joni Davis, Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer for Duke Energy defines diversity as “a wide range of human differences both visible and invisible”. While traits like gender and race tend to come to mind immediately when we hear the word “diversity”, other traits like age, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, thinking style, cultural background, marital status, political affiliation, and others are traits as well. Acknowledging the full spectrum of traits is a key factor in encouraging an inclusive environment. The Society for Human Resource Management CEO Johnny C. Taylor, Jr. insists, “A key challenge that many organizations face as the workforce continues to diversify is figuring out how to make all employees feel engaged and motivated.” The truth is that while race and gender continue to be areas of focus for many organizations, diversity today means so much more.

Myth #4 – D&I is a Human Resources responsibility.

Reality – D&I should be a leadership priority and embraced by all.

While it’s common to find D&I staff and initiatives led by Human Resources, organizations who have fully embraced D&I have often made it a leadership imperative. In fact, McKinsey & Company’s “Delivering through Diversity” report identifies executive leadership commitment as one of the four imperatives for delivering impact through I&D. The article asserts “CEOs and leaders must articulate a compelling vision, embedded with real accountability for delivery, and cascade down through middle management.” Ranked #2 on the 2020 Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For® Salesforce believes that leadership commitment is critical for D&I success. Salesforce’s Senior Director of Global Equity Programs Molly Ford shares, “At Salesforce, we believe that the business of business is to make the world a better place. Our higher purpose is to drive equality for all, and equality is a core value.” Consistent with this philosophy, Salesforce provides diversity data to its executive team on a monthly basis including their diversity numbers and progress. Ford explains, “It’s critical that we engage with our leaders in order to influence major organizational change.”

Ranked #3 on Forbes’ 2020 Best Employers for Diversity listing, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee insists that executive commitment is a key to its diversity and inclusion success. Ronald Harris, Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion shares, “For us D&I has been a top down journey. Our Board, CEO, and executive team have been actively engaged in the conversation.” Harris explains, “While diversity efforts began nearly two decades ago, the company’s office of diversity and inclusion has expanded and began reporting directly to the CEO since JD Hickey, M.D. took on that role.” When asked about his organization’s executive commitment, Harris insists, “Under JD’s leadership, inclusion is a business priority – with metrics and accountability. We just can’t afford to be culturally illiterate.”

Vernā Myers insists that while executive leadership engagement is key, D&I is ultimately everyone’s responsibility.

I think we have become aware that all leaders should be held accountable for building inclusive teams, but it is also true that all of us are leaders when it comes to our everyday interactions and decisions. Employees on every level, role and department have to recognize that they all have a sphere of influence where their attitudes and behaviors can either contribute to or detract from the overall I&D mission.

Vernā Myers, Vice President of Inclusion, Netflix

Многообразие и инклюзивность

Сегодня руководители компаний и государственные деятели все лучше осознают, что для успешной деятельности организации необходимы многообразие и инклюзивность. Уникальное исследование BCG опровергает распространенные мифы, связанные с вопросами многообразия и инклюзивности, и позволяет по-новому взглянуть на такие важные аспекты организационного развития, как карьерные цели, обеспечение мобильности, вовлеченности персонала и общей удовлетворенности сотрудников своим карьерным ростом. Нам удалось выяснить, какие именно решения приносят наилучшие результаты, и как сформировать культуру многообразия и инклюзивности, которая будет способствовать процветанию всей организации.

Наше исследование прекрасно иллюстрирует, что политика обеспечения многообразия и инклюзивности помогает частным компаниям и государственным учреждениям добиваться по-настоящему устойчивых и высоких результатов в долгосрочной перспективе. Мы выяснили, что усиление гендерного, демографического и социокультурного многообразия в руководящей команде способствует инновациям, вовлеченности сотрудников и улучшению финансовых показателей.

Полученные нами выводы также позволяют дать конкретные рекомендации относительно изменений и инвестиций, способствующих обеспечению многообразия и инклюзивности в организациях.

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